HUMBOLDT GROWER

– the gold standard

Cannabis Genetics Primer — December 2, 2017

Cannabis Genetics Primer

Oh, it is a complicated subject; but it is one that you can get your brain around. Let’s start with two terms – landrace and hybrid. These two categories are how cannabis comes; landrace strains are the relatively few that have evolved, pretty much on their own, in their native lands and hybrid strains are those that humans have been breeding. The most important types of cannabis are indica and sativa – the hybrids are combinations of these.

When you start breeding, you want your parent specimens (P1 and P2) to be as pure as possible – and this is really not always possible. So, it is very important that you breed for two or more characteristics or traits – potency, odor or color, etc.; but don’t try more than that on your first round. The seeds from your first round will be F1 and they will show all the dominate traits of the two parents. But, F1 is unstable and tend to not breed true as F2. You must pick out the traits you are isolating from the F1 line – say, a purple male and a purple female; by crossing plants with similar traits, you increase your chances of having a purple offspring.

Now you have an F2 and you are starting down the path to a stable strain. As you continue to cross for similar characteristics as your create new generations of cannabis, the F3, F4, F5 and more will become more and more reliable – eventually, your crossing will always show the purple characteristic.

A tip; clone your original P1 and your F1, F2 and so on. If there is a characteristic in the F1 that you do not want to lose, cloning will help you keep it. This is not breeding – which always involves pollen. You can also back cross your F1 or F2 into your P1 clone.

Do not rest on your laurels. Watch very carefully that your characteristic is expressing. And, be patient as it takes several seasons to achieve your breeding goals.

This has been real down and dirty. Dig around on the web for more information. Google “ cannabis breeding” and check out the images that come up. All those little breeding diagrams ought to make some more sense now.

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Humboldt Growers Collective has seeds… — November 30, 2017

Humboldt Growers Collective has seeds…

Humboldt Growers Collective has a selection of 2017 cannabis seeds available to its members. These were propagated and harvested here on the farm. Please get in touch if you would like more information. You must have proof of your 215 and join the Collective.

You can reach us at answers.humboldtgrowers@gmail.com.

We plan to offer many stains. A few are shown below; email us to find out what else we have available.

One of the strains the Collective can offer is Grand Daddy Purple. This is an F3 that has been backcrossed to its 2016 parent.

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Another of the strains the Collective can offer is Harlequin Tsunami, known for its CBD rich cannabis. This is also an F3 – based on the original work of Larry Ringo.

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And then, we have our own OG strain; this is in part based on Rascal and our own developed OG, which we call Hez. Continue reading

Humboldt Growers now distributes! — November 17, 2017

Humboldt Growers now distributes!

Humboldt Growers has expanded its operations to include a new distributorship in Santa Rosa, California – Humboldt Growers Distribution. Catchy name, eh?

We are very excited to have acquired this centrally located facility. We believe that this will allow us to be one of the main access points between Humboldt County and the urban areas around Santa Rosa.

Our Santa Rosa showroom opens January 1st. You can bring your farm’s story to the front line. We can help you with several of the sales problems that are rising up at the horizon. Don’t be left up on the mountain.

Contact us with your current product line so we can get you into our inventory asap.

Email us at answers.humboldtgrowers@gmail.com
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We have minimum farmer cient requirements =

– 215/Collective member option (until 2019)

– Preferred customers are County and State licensed or in process

– Clean, tested cannabis or cannabis product (with a report in hand/ we prefer a track record)

– Must be very high quality product – competition demands this
– well formed and attractive flower = (looks like indoor)
– high THC percentage
– distinctive odor or other characteristic

– Preferred sample size is one pound (but could be less). We will need our growers to reserve more of their sample for projected sales)

– Preferred dep grown, but we will accept other options if appropriate. We prefer multiple harvest farms growing clones.

– Provide a short narrative of your story.

– We will want to visit your farm and facility to make an assessment.
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We have minimum distributor client requirements =

Yes, we want to help your distributorship sell Humboldt cannabis through our distributorship.

– You need intake from as few sources as possible.

– We can help match total farm production annually to meet your distribution needs annually.

Cannabis Farmer Suicide — November 16, 2017

Cannabis Farmer Suicide

Is legalization actually such a good deal? The growers are getting overwhelmed… the whole process seems designed to remove the old core, smaller, growers. Maybe the black market still has its place for awhile…

The Counties and the State sure seem to have decided that legalization needs to fail. You only need to look at their taxation plans. Time to start emailing your elected officials – here in Humboldt and across the State.

And what about San Francisco and Los Angles? Looks like they might shut down the permitting process in their cities; and being among the biggest urban markets in the State, well, that would be quite a blow. Still, things are in serious flux.

I tell you, officials have mis-read the market. It ain’t the get rich scheme that everyone imagines. Those assumptions are going to kill the market. By the time the State works this out, the blackmarket will have been given a boost and the small legal farmer will be in the toilet.

“Resist – Support the Blackmarket” could well be the new battle cry of cannabis growers across the State. Humboldt Growers has strongly supported growers participating in the legalization of their farms; but, now, we have a doubt.

Somehow folks think that the cannabis farmer is naturally just as rich as they can be. This is a myth; most farmers (upwards of 80%) are very small. They really can’t afford the pile on that is happening at both the County and the State level. Just consider Humboldt County’s expectations for rural roads to our cannabis farms; now, these are roads that the County has ignored for decades, but, all of a sudden if you will, they want hardtops or Class 4 roads. This puts a tremendous financial pressure on the farms. And, it is only one example.

Somehow folks think that the cannabis farmer is a reprobate, a low-life criminal that must be watched carefully – just look at the new laws that are involved. This is a myth; the original 60’s and 70’s homesteaders were ex-urban, not criminals. The make a quick buck greenrushers are what you are looking at now. The smaller growers nurture their land; they do not and won’t destroy that land. This is where they live!

Both the County and the State want to benefit from all this imaginary cannabis wealth; but when the goose is dead, well, there aren’t any more eggs. The wealth is based on an illegal market that is not accessible to the County and the State; but it is accessible to those growing cannabis and that is where the growers will retreat.

But, the situation is changing and it can be changed. The “microbusiness” license could help to address these issues – it makes it easier for farmers to succeed in the market; a vigorous and successful resolution to the really large growers and the cartels would help; the tax burden could be scaled back, as the other legal States have already done; the licensing could be streamlined; how about State-backed farmer loans offered to help address these costs?

There are solutions for those that can think outside the box.

Fight fellow farmers. Stand your ground. Humboldt farmers have never retreated and we won’t now. Resist!

 

Well, its November – somehow… — November 15, 2017
The Sisters of the Valley visited the Ranch… — September 24, 2017

The Sisters of the Valley visited the Ranch…

The Sisters of the Valley, otherwise known as The Weed Sisters, came up to the Ranch last Thursday for a photo shoot with the British documentary film company Salon Pictures. We put together some lunch with staff and helped them out. They were a lot of fun.

 

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I interviewed them on my radio show, KMUD’s The Cannabis Show, airing each Thursday from 530 to 600PM. The show archives and streams at http://www.kmud.org. Sister Kate, the one in the middle in the picture, is quite outspoken about helping those in medical need.

I found them to be dedicated to their task. A “sisterhood”, while not related to any conventional religion, that is doing the good work.

June 2016 Larry OG sea of green… — June 11, 2016
Humboldt Spring… — June 7, 2016
ENVIRONMENT VS ECONOMY — May 9, 2015

ENVIRONMENT VS ECONOMY

People have been growing in Humboldt County now for three generations and a lot has changed in that time.
The original back to the landers came in the 70’s and 80’s. They escaped from the city and moved to the hills to raise their children in peace and quiet.  Today they are over 50 to 60 years of age, living on a 40 acre parcel that was likely sold to them by Bob Mckee for under $50,000 and has been paid for and developed for decades.  They can be characterized by their willingness to follow local 215 laws and their organic low environmental impact lifestyle.  They formed our core community.  That community has been persecuted under cannabis prohibition laws for many years. Over time that made for an introverted social structure, which did not lend itself to planning for the future.  We have been fortunate in our community initiatives (KMUD, Mateel, the new Theater, the Community Park, the Town Square) but very little in the way of economic infrastructure has been put in place for Southern Humboldt’s future generations.  The south county’s cities remain as yet unincorporated.
Generation X either left the then small farming community to look for work in an urban area or stayed to homestead and grow pot like their parents.  Those who followed in their parents footsteps hoped to purchase property and settle down. They encountered a very different situation than their parents had years before. Property became incredibly inflated due to the influx of growers.  People who were willing to sell their properties after a lifetime of “cash living” were looking for a large check as a down payment and were unwilling to owner finance.  This put property in Humboldt out of reach for many of the Gen X locals.  To purchase property in Humboldt county,you must either grow in “excess” or be wealthy and from out of the area.  In this way much of the land was not conveyed to Gen. X locals.  Instead communities were overrun by growers big enough to afford it or  our “newcomers”.
In fact, if the land developer Bob Mckee had not made it his life’s work to put young locals on Humboldt properties, today less than 10% of Southern Humboldt’s land would have been passed on to the rightful stewards.  Thanks to Bob So. Hum. residents have a future.

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The Generation X crew that stayed behind and made it onto a piece of property are now for the most part the heart and soul of south county.  They can be characterized as innovative, independent, and sustainable. They are responsible stewards of the land.  They are leading the way in new techniques and technology.  They are the world’s best cannabis farmers.  They are in the prime of their lives.  They have bonded together, shared information and standardized growing methods, genetics and marketing.  Today they are singlehandedly responsible for Humboldt County’s position in the world market.
Third generation cannabis farmers in Humboldt county are generally not yet landowners. They are looking for opportunities on farms large enough to sustain a team of employees.  This generally means they are working on a maybe not so sustainable farm just to make ends meet.  They are disconnected from the lessons learned about the environment by the back to the land generation. Their chances of owning land are almost non-existent. They have neither been taught about the past or provided a future.
These three generations have very different perspectives and very different needs.  By understanding what drives each of them we may be able to forge a future that includes all of us.
The elders are retiring.  They may not have put a lot of energy into planning for the future before, but now they want to pass something meaningful on to the younger generations and at the same time insure their lands will be preserved for posterity. They are scared that commercial growing is going to destroy their way of life.  Have they asked themselves if their way of life IS economically sustainable?  Without larger growers maintaining brand consistency, would the “small grower” on his “small farm” stand a chance in the national market?
The two younger generations are looking for the American dream.  They want the freedom to make as much money as they can.  They are not set on destroying the environment.  They are attempting to establish themselves and deal with difficult economic conditions. They certainly don’t want anyone defining what is or is not greedy or materialistic for them.  Much less people who haven’t put themselves in their shoes! They are very concerned that they have enough water to follow their dream  If they mismanage their water supply, they know that they won’t stand a chance in the national market.
In short, the elders want environmental stability and the youngsters want economic stability.  Everyone wants their way of life to continue being viable.
These participants currently do not seem to understand each other. A line has been drawn in the sand between “small” and “large” growers.  The assumption is that ALL small growers are low impact,sustainable eco-growers while ALL“large” growers are Bulgarian, greedy, fish killing, environmental hazards.  These are both gross generalizations.
It is much more complicated than that.  Labeling people and deciding who is and isn’t greedy is unacceptable – 99% of Humboldt County growers are neither “large” nor “greedy” when compared to other agricultural ventures.  This over generalization about “the evil grower” has now escalated into a militant witch hunt.   We at Humboldt Growers don’t understand why people who have been so persecuted would then choose persecution over resolution.  The 6th draft Humboldt County Ordinance suggests more aggressive policing of Humboldt County cannabis farms.  That is not even remotely possible; and if it were, the county would gladly use all of our hard earned tax dollars policing us rather than spend it on schools and hospitals!
If people are unhappy with the results they should look at the causes before casting blame.
The United States Federal Government has proven without a doubt that policing and persecuting cannabis cultivators is a losing battle.  Confrontation will not work. Cannabis cultivators have been trained to evade and rebel. Offer them well thought out solutions that benefit them!
Looking at this dilemma globally:  Humboldt County is number one in the world for quality and consistency, but when it comes to volume we are way outclassed. Other county’s have way more arable, low elevation flat land and water.  To maintain our current market positioning(economic stability), we may need to direct ALL of Humboldt county’s resources(sustainably) at cannabis cultivation.  Currently those resources are being mismanaged. Someone needs to do a study that shows our standing in terms of resources in relation to our competition.  Then we need to work together to manage the resources we have to our advantage.
Farming communities in cultures all over the world have a long history of helping their neighbors, leading by example, and passing knowledge from one generation to the next.  They have done this to preserve a way of life, manage their lands, and build community.
When we see that our neighbor is from out of town, knows nothing about fire safety, erosion control, or pest management and is struggling with exaggerated costs and plummeting prices while trying to make himself a home, let’s be compassionate and go help him, rather than ask the authorities to persecute him for doing the same thing we did.  I think we will be surprised to see that people want help and advice. People need to see what they can do, not be told what they can’t do.  Show them the way.  Provide them with information on how to grow amazing sustainable cannabis. Make them one of the team.
Different players play different roles. The retiring elder has been cultivating world class mazari genetics on his small farm for a lifetime. Much of these genetics are yet untapped. The world has not really seen them.  These old timers are up on the hill breeding the next “big hit”.  These guys are also now on the front lines, again, creating state laws that need to provide us all a future. We need them!
Conversely the younger generation has their role. They are working together to standardize growing methods and unify behind popular genetics while managing the vast number of buyers coming in. The elders need to piggyback off this market stability.  Buyers are not coming to Humboldt for 50-100 pounds of mazari ranch weed.  They want 100 pounds at a time of consistent kush or sour diesel product.
If we all see that we are in this together and that we play different but equally important roles,  we can make sure we get what we have spent three generations fighting for.
To make this “transition” go smoothly, people need to understand that the cannabis farmer won the war on drugs.  Traditionally that means they get to set terms and make demands.  Currently 90% of the cannabis grown in Humboldt county is sold out of state.  Legalization offers the farmer nothing but regulation.  That means these people have no reason to comply.  Sending more enforcement(with or without guns) will only waste time and tax dollars.  If we can sell the Humboldt county grower economic stability, they will buy it.
We need to agree on a sustainable plan that makes converting to legalization advantageous to the grower and does not include heavy handed enforcement and policing.
We should adopt the Bob Mckey model and form a “land management association”.  This association will designate climate zones where certain types of cannabis can be grown, identify at risk properties and purchase them as agricultural preserves, and form a “HELP Task Force” of neighbors to bring newcomers and those who have strayed into the fold.
Finally, the incorporation of Southern Humboldt cities must be front and center  in the deal we are striking with the county.  Let us ask what services the county intends to offer us before we worry about how much we are paying in taxes.  We need infrastructure in south county and we need national representation. Lets put together a package that describes what we need to maintain the way of life we have now long after legalization. If we vote the 6th ordinance in without incorporating, all of our tax dollars will go towards Northern Humboldt’s infrastructure and we will get nothing.
We need the older generation to offer solutions that take into account a sustainable future for generations to come in Humboldt county.  Do not overregulate like the other legalized states have.  Remember they did not have a thriving economy to destroy.  We are unveiling the largest independently owned business the world has ever seen.  Please find a common ground and make sure that the pending legalization provides a future for us all.